Would Your Remove Skills from Your LinkedIn Profile?

Keep it current!

Sure you would – and should – if they don’t describe the kind of work you are doing and want to do. LinkedIn can be a fantastic resource for connecting with potential clients, resources and partners. A good review of your social media profiles is essential when you’re hoping to make the right kinds of connections and do your best by your customers.

Take a look at your own LinkedIn profile and make sure the skills you’re listing are exactly the ones you want to promote.

Even if you’re not seeking employment, LinkedIn can be a fabulous way to stay on top of industry trends, changes in corporate leadership, raging debates on current affairs and – my personal favorite – an excellent source of solutions for problems your business faces day to day. I use LinkedIn Answers at least twice a month to solve or problem or find a new way to complete an old task.

Another great resource available on LinkedIn is SlideShare that allows users to showcase their best presentations and attract the right kind of audience. My most recent upload has received 80 views in 4 weeks. It really showcases my perspective and brand. What presentation would convey your essential messages?

If LinkedIn isn’t one of your favorite social media sites, maybe it should be! Connect with me and grow your skill set!

 

 

Get Your Social Media Team into Shape

You have to use the right tools for your goals

You have to use the right tools for your goals

PRDaily recently ran my blog “6 Reasons Why An Athlete Should Run Your Social Media.” It should be obvious by now that I firmly believe running inspires me personally and professionally. But I’m not the only one. Here’s what folks on Twitter have been saying:

Those are just a few of the replies. I used Storify to collect many more responses to this post and can help you learn how to use Storify to capture responses to your campaigns, too!

Seriously? You still don’t have social media profiles?

 

Take your pick!

A client of mine wrote a book. Our publicity plan involved a virtual book tour and we hoped some talented,exciting bloggers in her field would review her book and visit her site.

It’s a great book – full of practical steps to take to achieve a goal. It’s not too expensive and really bolsters her position as an expert on her topic. It would get great reviews.

Problem: some of these bloggers we approached couldn’t access her site. I freaked out – what do you mean some people can’t access your site?

“Not the first time this has happened,” my client said. “My web team tells me there’s nothing to do.”

I am not a computer or internet security expert, so please don’t expect an explanation but if some settings are “too high” then many people can’t view her website and access her extensive knowledge.

I am the kind of person who likes things to work the way I want them to. I didn’t care that their settings were too high, but I did care that these excellent bloggers wouldn’t do a book review because they couldn’t check out my clients’ sweet site!

Thank goodness she had well-developed social media platforms.

Thank goodness this client had an active Facebook page! Thank goodness she had a lively Twitter stream! Thank goodness she curated interesting content on Pinterest and was frequently updating her YouTube channel! Woo! Way to go client!!

Do you seriously still not have profiles on at least one or two platforms? What are you waiting for?

 

 

Should You Deliver Bad News in Person?

Showing Emotion via smiley faces

Emoji add some tone to written messages - but nothing replaces real face-to-face communication

Should you deliver bad news in person?

I would argue yes.

Experts say that 70% of our message is carried in non-verbal communication, that is how we convey meaning without words. The height of our eyebrows, the position of our arms, the volume of our voice, even the rate we blink all carry important information about our message to our listeners. People believe the messages they receive from non-verbal channels more than the words they hear. Purely written communication loses a huge amount of information and is so easily misinterpreted.

This spring, the Cellcom Green Bay marathon was called off due to heat and a lot of runners were angry.

This spring many cities experienced unseasonably warm weather. The well-known Boston Marathon reported that just under 2,000 runners received some kind of medical attention due to the heat. My local marathon, the Dick’s Sporting Goods Pittsburgh Marathon, was at a red flag due to heat.

Unfortunately the organizers of the Cellcom Green Bay Marathon missed an opportunity to connect with their customers – the 51% of runners who didn’t get official results. Only a written statement appeared on their website, explaining their concern for runner safety.

If they were my client, I would have recommended creating and sharing a simple video from the race director, expressing regret for the fact that the weather was out of their control and that runner safety was, and is, their number one priority. And if the race director didn’t have the communication skills to express that perfect mix of regret, compassion and executive decision-making power, then find someone with authority who could.

It’s so easy to share videos today, thanks to smartphones and the variety of social media platforms (Facebook, YouTube, Pinterest, and via video sharing on LinkedIn)  all businesses should be thinking of ways to maximize the delivery of their messages to their customers – not just 30%.

 

Smartphone Apps for Writers – Featured Post

Looking for some innovative marketing ideas? Check out my guest post “3 Ways Smartphone Apps Can Help Writers Get More Gigs!” on Make a Living Writing.