Writer – Fiction and Non-Fiction

creative children's writer

Elizabeth Pagel-Hogan, Writer

Fiction, non-fiction, crafts, and more.

Magazines:

  • Highlights for Children
  • Cricket
  • Muse
  • Family Fun

Educational Publishing: 

  • Heinemann Literacy Project, Fountas & Pinnell Classroom (upper middle school)
  • Capstone
  • KPS Storybook Project, (PK-2)
  • Name That Text Structure
  • ABC-CLIO

More on my biography and my writing samples.

Business Services including editing, ghostwriting, biographies, and e-books.

Awards:

Contact me at 412.837.9499 or by email.

Grab a book below!

Would Your Remove Skills from Your LinkedIn Profile?

Keep it current!

Sure you would – and should – if they don’t describe the kind of work you are doing and want to do. LinkedIn can be a fantastic resource for connecting with potential clients, resources and partners. A good review of your social media profiles is essential when you’re hoping to make the right kinds of connections and do your best by your customers.

Take a look at your own LinkedIn profile and make sure the skills you’re listing are exactly the ones you want to promote.

Even if you’re not seeking employment, LinkedIn can be a fabulous way to stay on top of industry trends, changes in corporate leadership, raging debates on current affairs and – my personal favorite – an excellent source of solutions for problems your business faces day to day. I use LinkedIn Answers at least twice a month to solve or problem or find a new way to complete an old task.

Another great resource available on LinkedIn is SlideShare that allows users to showcase their best presentations and attract the right kind of audience. My most recent upload has received 80 views in 4 weeks. It really showcases my perspective and brand. What presentation would convey your essential messages?

If LinkedIn isn’t one of your favorite social media sites, maybe it should be! Connect with me and grow your skill set!

 

 

Get Your Social Media Team into Shape

You have to use the right tools for your goals

You have to use the right tools for your goals

PRDaily recently ran my blog “6 Reasons Why An Athlete Should Run Your Social Media.” It should be obvious by now that I firmly believe running inspires me personally and professionally. But I’m not the only one. Here’s what folks on Twitter have been saying:

Those are just a few of the replies. I used Storify to collect many more responses to this post and can help you learn how to use Storify to capture responses to your campaigns, too!

Recipe for Success: Simple Social Media Growth

 

Social media isn’t rocket science!

Debi Gilboa, MD, of AskDoctorG, is a rising name and national parenting expert and author of “Teach Resilience:Raising Kids Who Can Launch.” Over the past year, her social media engagement has increased significantly and she’s more than doubled her weekly newsletter following. She didn’t hire a massive marketing agency, she found the recipe for success herself.

What were 3 things you did that increased your followers?

  • I followed folks that were on the lists that other people put me on. Convoluted I know, but go to your own profile page, click lists, then switch to member of (from subscribed). This will show all the places you’ve been listed. I switch to “people” from “tweets” and follow other like-minded folks.
  • I follow a little indiscriminately but then use twit cleaner to clean up my follows about once a month – stop following those without good content or real interaction.
  • I never RT or tweet out anything I don’t actually read and agree with.

How much time did you invest?

I invest on average 30 minutes a day to social media, sometimes lots more but often a fair amount less. And I take one day completely off a week.

What’s your favorite channel?

Favorite is Twitter, but Facebook is close behind and learning to love Pinterest!

 

Seriously? You still don’t have social media profiles?

 

Take your pick!

A client of mine wrote a book. Our publicity plan involved a virtual book tour and we hoped some talented,exciting bloggers in her field would review her book and visit her site.

It’s a great book – full of practical steps to take to achieve a goal. It’s not too expensive and really bolsters her position as an expert on her topic. It would get great reviews.

Problem: some of these bloggers we approached couldn’t access her site. I freaked out – what do you mean some people can’t access your site?

“Not the first time this has happened,” my client said. “My web team tells me there’s nothing to do.”

I am not a computer or internet security expert, so please don’t expect an explanation but if some settings are “too high” then many people can’t view her website and access her extensive knowledge.

I am the kind of person who likes things to work the way I want them to. I didn’t care that their settings were too high, but I did care that these excellent bloggers wouldn’t do a book review because they couldn’t check out my clients’ sweet site!

Thank goodness she had well-developed social media platforms.

Thank goodness this client had an active Facebook page! Thank goodness she had a lively Twitter stream! Thank goodness she curated interesting content on Pinterest and was frequently updating her YouTube channel! Woo! Way to go client!!

Do you seriously still not have profiles on at least one or two platforms? What are you waiting for?

 

 

Does Your Business Need a Social Media Coach?

I work out a lot – for fun, for stress relief, and because it’s in my nature to set and strive to achieve goals. To help

Work Hard for the Results You Want

me reach these fitness goals, I hired a coach. Having a coach gives me accountability and someone to help me overcome obstacles and celebrate my successes.

For my clients, I’m their social media coach. I don’t always write all their content – many times I’m just laying out their editorial calendar (training schedule) and teaching them how and when to use new platforms (workouts).

But my own training hit a bump in the road when my coach accepted a new job in another state. Now I am meeting her replacement and I have to bring her up to speed on my goals, my philosophy, my strengths, weaknesses, what I’m afraid to try and what motivates me. The good part is – I know what I want her to know.

I try to help my customers with the same thing. One thing I offer my customers is the creation of a social media policy or guidelines. I know there will come a time when I need to move on or they decide to take over these tasks in-house. By working with my customers to build a social media policy, my goal is to make the transition and education of their new social media manager as simple as possible. I can’t make it seamless, but I can give them a sense of history of what customers have hated and what they’ve loved, what we’ve tried (and where we’ve failed) and the overall goals all of this creative work!

Does social media make you nervous?

I found out recently that some employees at one of my customers’ offices are scared to talk around me! They are

Social Media makes some people nervous

worried that anything and everything they say will end up on the Interwebs via one of the nine social media platforms that I manage for their brand. Where did they get that idea?

They are scared to say something wrong and don’t realize they are valuable sources of information.So to counteract the feelings of fear, in this particular office – I have a new strategy.

I now email staff and ask what they are up to that week. Sometimes I ask for their “three most challenging tasks” or “the thing they never thought would be part of this job” or “their favorite activity/what makes it all worthwhile.” I also ask for photos of their day-to-day or that captures what can’t be expressed in words.

This had led to astonishing success and resulted in very engaging and useful info from various levels – like the accountant, the CEO and even the warehouse manager! Seems like all they needed was a little structure they could trust to increase their comfort with providing content.

I know their customers are going to love what I have to share. It’s content gold.

So, how does your enterprise make it easier or more comfortable for employees to give you the content you need?

Need social media content? Become an Alchemist

Turn their two cents into content gold!

Can’t think of what to write for that next blog post, tweet or update? Even the most creative writer gets in a slump. I never get “writer’s block” because I’ve discovered that I’m an alchemist. What looks like ordinary matter to some is pure gold to me.

After I get my feet wet working for clients with several employees, I turn on my nosey side. Actually, that side is rarely turned off, so let’s say I ramp it up a bit and market it as “the natural curiosity of a writer.” I will actually linger in the kitchen and strike up conversations with folks I haven’t met. I’ll start a hallway conversation and invite passers-by to comment on a topic I’m covering. I’ll pop my head into someone’s office, asking if they’ve seen so-and-so (who I know isn’t around) and then casually get their opinion on a current project. I rarely talk – my goal is to get them talking. And each time I engage in one of these tactics, which could appear to be time-wasters, I’m turning what could be ordinary information into writer’s gold.

No one person knows the complete ins and outs of a medium to large organization. There are tiny pockets of useful information stored all over the staff and as a writer and social media strategist for several clients, I know you cannot sit at your temporary desk or in your cubicle-on-loan waiting for people to drop juicy details in your lap. You’ve got to go and uncover them, sometimes with the delicate brush and other times with a pickaxe. As an outside consultant, I’m fortunate to see connections that others inside the organization take for granted and overlook. It’s probably a little easier for people to share things with me than to share with their co-workers or managers. I’m thrilled when someone begins a sentence with, “No one else really knows this but…” That usually means they are about to share something really exciting and I can bring it to the attention of eager customers and loyal followers.

I also never take the credit for content I get this way. I share the love. I mention to my point person how valuable it was to speak with the lady in accounting, or the man in tech support, or the folks in operations who pointed out a new system they are trying to streamline a project. I want to person who hired me to realize what a great team they have in place. I also want the people who shared ideas and thoughts with me to realize they have a lot to offer.

So if you’re trying to go it alone and create all the content for your business blog, Twitter feed, Facebook posts, Pinterest images, Google+ page, or YouTube channel – take a step away from your computer and become an alchemist. Turn that ordinary material into social media gold!

Who Edits Your Tweets?

“I wish I could convince our staff to send all their tweets to an editor like you before they went live,” a friend said to me recently. He’s the Assistant Director for Legal Affairs for a large university and often has to discuss inappropriate tweet content with other university staff.

He’s not the only one. Many managers and CEOs struggle with how to handle tweets from their employers that could reflect poorly on the brand.

Most people don’t think before they speak, so it’s not surprising they don’t think before they tweet.

I asked what the university’s social media policy said about tweets in bad taste. He said they didn’t a policy! Basically, they apply existing rules about inappropriate content, brand use, communication and non-harassement policies to monitor and police social media activities.

No social media policy in place! Shocked? Don’t be – again, this university isn’t the only one.

One of my tasks for a recent client was to put together a reasonable social media policy. They also struggled with a situation where employees made rude, inappropriate or immature comments on their personal social media platforms and worried it would negatively impact their brand.

To put together a policy that would work for their needs, I tapped into some great examples from companies like Ford and Best Buy highlighted by one of my favorite sites, Hubspot, and assembled an easy to read guide that explained the expectations of the client for their employees.

It’s unrealistic to tell people they can’t have personal accounts, use them during the workday, or discuss difficult topics on their personal social media accounts. But you can ask employees to be clear that not all their statements represent the voice of the brand. Savvy employers can learn a lot from employees by paying attention to their social media content.

Does your company have a policy in place? How did you decide what worked for your organization?

How do you handle negative comments?

Many businesses worry about having Facebook pages, Twitter accounts, Pinterest pages or a blog that allows

Prepare for best & worst case!

people to post comments. They wonder, “If people complain about us on these platforms, it will make us look bad!”

What really looks bad is not receiving negative comments, but handling them poorly. Take a look at this negative review that one of my clients received:

Review of “The Business”
Posted by “Customer”
The Business advertises itself as place to help not only normally developing children, but one with disabilities. I was informed that their social butterflies program would be good for my son with autism as they have a “developmentalist” who leads the class. I was also told by my wrap around agency that the agency which head behavior services that I could not take my son’s TSS to the program because The Business has their own developmentist and in essence it would be like paying two people the (TSS and the developmentalist at The Business) to do the same job. So I went to The Business with my autistic son who is almost 3 to find that the developmentalist completely ignored him. She never prompted him once to do anything. She never gave me any instructions and expected me to figure it out on my own. And ontop she keep opening the door to class which allowed my son to keep running out. In fact the main doors to building were wide open to the street!!!! Completely irresponsibly and lacking in understanding of someone with autism!!! Clearly The Business is falsely advertising about their programs or their developmentalist is not qualified. I was disappointed and also do not understand how they are also allowed to provide services for the county.

Would you choose to respond to or ignore this comment?

I advised this client to respond and to respond in a positive, nonspecific way that encouraged the parent to speak directly to the service provider about the experience. Here’s what they wrote:

Business Response
Greetings “Customer”. Thank you for your feedback. It appears that there has been some miscommunication along the line, so please feel free to be in touch with us directly to further discuss. We value all children and their families, so we hope we can chat with you about your feedback and concerns.

It’s a great reply that shows this business watches it’s online reputation, that it seeks to assist customers who did not have a great experience, but also doesn’t air dirty laundry or get into battles online. It’s the best way to handle negative comments in this social age.

Have you ever received a negative review of your business? How did you handle it?